Pwllpeiran goes open to the public..

Pwllpeiran goes open to the public..

By Ben Roberts

So, it’s been a while! Don’t worry we’re still here.. but it has been busy. So what have we been up to?

The Pwllpeiran Open Day

This has to have been a particularly memorable highlight.On the 17th of May, we opened Pwllpeiran’s doors to the public. In conjunction with Farming connect, we hosted an open day aiming to show people the type of work being undertaken at Pwllpeiran at the moment, as well as having a wider discussion on the importance and direction that the Uplands hold and are likely to have in future.JS59765812-1

Following a particularly warm and sunny spell, the weather forecast for the day carried a much more ominous prediction. Undeterred however, we gathered our wits in the morning and many of us dispersed to various research plots around the site. The first batches of visitors started arriving at 11am and were given talks by IBERS’s Jon Moorby, and Bangor University’s Prysor Williams on the topic of ‘sustainable intensification’. Following this, a trusty team of minibus drivers chauffeured the guests to the various different plots to get a closer look at the work being done, and ask any questions to the respective researchers 5000113c4a53cf98a6edc50e11845c6don site. Unfortunately, by the time people had begun coming to the plots- the Met-office weather forecast oracles suddenly appeared right in their prediction. Shower after shower followed resulting in very soggy visitors, and a personal lamentation that I had chosen to wear jeans that morning! Nevertheless, the day definitely felt like a success- and the weather merely provided an insight for the visitors into the often tricky work conditions that we face in the field (though I can’t say I was too grateful at the time!). Below is a video that was taken using our relatively new time-lapse camera (spot the rain when it arrives!);

A big thank you must go out to everyone involved; members of staff from IBERS Gogerddan (especially Jon x 2, Ellen, John and Jim), business partners, Farming Connect, Prysor, and finally Merann catering- whose on-site burger van provided much need sustenance in the cold, wet afternoon!

 

Cutting for Gold

By Hannah Vallin

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A new face to the team, a new blog and a new post. Having joined the Pwllpeiran upland research team only three weeks ago, it has certainly been a busy introduction to the job.  I found myself tagging along on the day to day tasks, learning the ropes, and providing an extra pair of hands just in time for harvesting all the daffodils upon the research plots.  The endless rows of daffodils are part of the project ‘Innovative system for sustainable daffodil-derived galanthamine production in the uplands’.  After a quick summary of the project it was straight outside to get to work.

During the end of April, believe it or not, the weather here in the Welsh uplands gave us a break of dry sunny calm days.  Shocking I know, but perfect timing for us to harvest the daffodil plots. The considerably mild conditions this year has encouraged the daffodils to thrive. We all know daffodils to be a clear sign of spring, covering fields and road sides with bright yellow and orange colours, while small lambs bound in the fields. The two sights go perfectly together and give everyone hope that the winter months are over and we might, just might, get that lovely hot summer we have all been waiting for.  So you are probably thinking that the rolling Welsh hills are now covered in beautiful yellow flowers. Well, not anymore.  We harvest the daffodils at the ‘goose-neck’ stage when their galanthamine (the yellow gold we are after) content is at its highest concentration.  I’m afraid we don’t really give the daffodils time to bloom into lovely open yellow flowers, or, if they do they are chopped pretty soon after.

Within the space of a week the Pwllpeiran team took to the hills and harvested 6ha. The side kick team comprising of Mariecia, Ben and I went up prior to John and Gareth who had the tractors, trailers, 4X4’s and of course the trusty harvester! We sub-sampled all the plots for our own analysis back here at the research centre using our very own Edward scissors hands, or just fancy hand clippers! It was then the job of our trusty two men to harvest the lot. Keeping in mind that only two lines of daffodils at a time could be chopped and the tractor (New Holland 1920) was rather slow moving, pulling the harvester behind, one week wasn’t bad going. Big thumbs up to Gareth who endured the not so comfy tractor seat all day long for a week, his precise positioning up and down the daffodil plots and of course what would any field experiment be without some kind technical mishap… let’s just say a few machinery issues in the beginning. Luckily enough thanks to a local bearing man in Aberystwyth all our problems were resolved in no time. I also took the opportunity, while the weather was fairly decent, to document our harvesting season.  The GoPro’s boxed up in the office were finally taken out and put to the test. It’s not quite a bird’s eye view, more so a tractor view, of the harvesting. That’s right we stuck the GoPro onto the tractor and the back of the harvester! As it drove off down the steep hillside there was a moment of uncertainty as to whether the sticky attachments would hold or not. Alas, they did, and you can take a peek at the short video I made to show off our site!

So after a busy week of being out in the field in the sunshine, hard life I know, what’s next?

A lot. A lot of sample analysis back in the lab; boxes and bags full of daffodils! While this part may be less thrilling and slightly more time consuming, it does allow us time for working on our acapella voices, singing while we work.  Remaining positive from our successful, and may I say extremely efficient, harvesting we should have a lot of progressive data for analysis.

From the new arrival in the team, coming to the end of my first blog (give me chance, I shall improve!), I shall end on this note. The next new arrivals to Pwllpeiran in the upcoming weeks are not that of a human form…!  Keep an eye out for our updated blog on the exciting projects we have lined up, and who or what they involve!

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Pwllpeiran

A new season, a new blog

20th January 2016 02

Ben’s note;

Hello, and welcome to our blog!

As you may have seen from our other pages, this blog has been set up to provide a little bit of information on the general activities that occur at the the Pwllpeiran upland research platform. Why a blog though?  Well, for the ‘communicating research’ module of my undergraduate degree at Aberystwyth University the main aim of the module was to…  well…  communicate research.  One of the ways covered was establishing a blog.  During that wet lunchtime mentioned on the ‘Why blog?’ page, I thought this would be a perfect chance to put in to practice, what I’d learnt in that module.  The only problem being.. as the blog was my idea, I’ve been tasked with writing the first post.  So here it goes; hope you enjoy! 


A general update from Pwllpeiran

So what’s been going on?  Well, the daffodils are growing! The wet are unseasonably warm weather in December meant that the daffodils were growing even in the heart of the winter months. However by February, the temperature had dropped significantly and all growth – both daffodils and grass seemed to cease. Some days we had glorious sunshine, and using the excuse of checking the daffodil plots – meant I could enjoy the terrain and go running. Though I hadn’t quite considered how bad the wind chill on the top fields would be – needless to say, running shorts in future probably isn’t enough alone! This aside, as we approach the end of February, the weather has warmed considerably and the daffodils are slowly moving their way up again.

Finding a biscuit within a hay stack- Keeping a track on the temperature

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Planting a data-logger. See you in six months!

Having had mild weather in December, and with many reporting this winter as the warmest on record, this had us wondering; ‘Will this affect the daffodil growth?’. Probably, So we decided that collecting data from our weather stations on site wasn’t enough- we need to know what was happening in the soil. So on a cold Mid January day, six digestive-biscuit sized data loggers were placed into the soil, taking great care to mark exactly where we had put them. None of us are enthusiastic about spending a day in the future searching the ground  for.. well.. maybe not a needle, but certainly a biscuit in a haystack!

The hope is, that when the data loggers are full in a few months time we’ll be able to gauge if/ how much the daffodils were affected by this unusual warm start to winter. Presuming we actually find the data-loggers that is!

 

New people

It should also be mentioned that the few first months of 2016 has also seen the arrival of some new faces. Dan; having finished his undergraduate degree in Bangor last summer arrived at the end of January and has begun his PhD on the Brignant extensification plots. Mike, recently returned from working in Australia for the past 5 years – has begun working at Pwllpeiran looking into utilising genetic analysis in upland systems. These arrivals have brought a welcome increase in ideas and knowledge to the research hub – though have likely been a contributing factor to the shortage of biscuits in the kitchen cupboard recently!


 

The first of many

Hopefully you’ve enjoyed looking around our blog! If so, feel free to follow us here, or on our twitter page (@uplandresources). We hope to update the blog regularly with updates, fun facts, and discussion from different member of the Pwllpeiran team.. Which hopefully will make you (and us!) more aware of what goes on in our uplands.

Until next time!

Ben